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Commercial relations between Spain and Spanish America in the era of free trade, 1778-1796 by John Robert Fisher

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Published by Centre for Latin-American Studies, University of Liverpool in Liverpool, U.K .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Spain,
  • Latin America

Subjects:

  • Spain -- Commerce -- Latin America -- History -- 18th century.,
  • Latin America -- Commerce -- Spain -- History -- 18th century.,
  • Spain -- Commercial policy -- History -- 18th century.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 152-155.

StatementJohn Fisher.
SeriesMonograph series / Centre for Latin American Studies, University of Liverpool ;, no. 13, Monograph series (University of Liverpool. Centre for Latin-American Studies) ;, no. 13.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHF3688.L3 F57 1985
The Physical Object
Pagination158 p. :
Number of Pages158
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2288715M
ISBN 100902806122
LC Control Number86156898

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Book review, Commercial Relations between Spain and Spanish America in the Era of Free Trade. Imperial 'Free Trade' and the Hispanic Economy, by JOHN FISHER* It has been traditional for students of the Hispanic world in the eighteenth century to identify the introduction of 'free trade' between Spain and her American empire as the cornerstone of the Bourbon programme of economic reform. Continuation of the author's Commercial relations between Spain and Spanish America in the era of free trade, Description: pages ; 21 cm. Series Title: Monograph series (University of Liverpool. Institute of Latin American Studies), no. Other Titles: Exports from Spain to Spanish America, Responsibility: John Fisher. The Bourbon Reforms produced mixed results. Spain reconquered Florida during the American Revolution and the empire stood well defended as the century advanced, but by arming Americans effectively and granting them military privileges, the crown risked losing political control, a danger destined to become reality during the independence movement of the early nineteenth century. Commercial deregulation undoubtedly stimulated legal commerce.

The traditional, stereotyped interpretation of economic relations between Spain and Spanish America during the colonial period may be summed up as follows: the principal motive for Spanish imperial expansion was the search for gold; the commercial system created in the sixteenth century for the regulation of trans-Atlantic trade succeeded on the whole in protecting treasure shipments, but its restrictive features encouraged Spanish Americans . This article analyses, first, the principal features of Spain's commercial policies towards Spanish America in free trade96, its principal sources are shipping registers and associated inter-ministerial correspondence in the Archivo General de Indias of : Adrian Pearce. Free Trade Act Preceded by piecemeal reforms for the Caribbean islands (), Yucatán (), Santa Marta and Riohacha (), and Buenos Aires, Chile, and Peru (2 February ), it extended imperial free trade to all of the American empire except Venezuela and Mexico and opened thirteen Spanish ports to the colonial trade. Fisher, John R. Commercial Relations between Spain and Spanish America in the Era of Free Trade, – Liverpool, University of Liverpool, ISBN ; Fisher, John R. Silver Mines and Silver Miners in Colonial Peru, – Liverpool, ISBN

Fisher, John R. Commercial Relations between Spain and Spanish America in the Era of Free Trade, – Liverpool: Centre for Latin-American Studies, University of Liverpool, Fisher, John R. El comercio entre España e Hispanoamérica –Cited by: Start studying World Civilization II midterm. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. A network of inter-colonial trade in the Hapsburg period linked the viceroyalties of Peru and New Spain to one another through the Mexican port of Acapulco, and, after Spain's conquest of the Philippines in the s, also led to the growth of a trans-Pacific trade to Manila, the capital of the Philippines. This chapter explores Spain's colonial trade with America and the Hapsburg monarchy's. Monograph series (University of Liverpool. Institute of Latin American Studies) ; General note: Continuation of the author's Commercial relations between Spain and Spanish America in the era of free trade, Contributor: University of Liverpool. Institute of Latin American Studies. Uniform title: Exports from Spain to Spanish America.