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The economics of counterfeit trade governments, consumers, pirates, and intellectual property rights by Peggy Chaudhry

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Published by Springer in Berlin .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Commerce,
  • Product counterfeiting,
  • Prevention,
  • Commercial policy

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p.177-188) and index.

StatementPeggy Chaudhry, Alan Zimmerman
ContributionsZimmerman, Alan S., 1942-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHF1040.7 .C455 2009
The Physical Object
Paginationxv, 194 p. :
Number of Pages194
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24901624M
ISBN 103540778349, 3540778357
ISBN 109783540778349, 9783540778356
LC Control Number2008940287
OCLC/WorldCa317745852

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This is the first book to fully examine the size of the counterfeit market. Many authors have proposed actions to combat counterfeiting. Chaudhry and Zimmerman are the first to take a global look at the intellectual property environment using a research-based approach. Roadmap of the Book 3 2 The Global Growth of Counterfeit Trade 7 Introduction 7 History of Counterfeiting 7 Measuring the Counterfeit Market 9 The Growth of the Counterfeit Goods Market 11 Effects on the US 13 Products Counterfeited 15 Large and Small Firms Affected 17 Reasons for the Growth of Counterfeit.   The Economics of Counterfeit Trade by Peggy E. Chaudhry, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. The Economics of Counterfeit Trade: Governments, Consumers, Pirates and Intellectual Property Rights Alan Zimmerman, Peggy Chaudhry (auth.) Walk down any main street in Shanghai, Paris or New York and you will see evidence of the counterfeit goods trade.

The Economic Impacts of Counterfeiting and Piracy – Report prepared for BASCAP and INTA Get the document. This report shows that the infiltration of counterfeit and pirated products, or IP theft, creates an enormous drain on the global economy – crowding out Billions in legitimate economic activity and facilitating an “underground economy” that deprives governments of revenues for.   Genuine economic activity loses out. Consumers who knowingly purchase counterfeit products are unlikely to have purchased genuine equivalents and often do so because the counterfeit versions are much cheaper. This means that legitimate companies face competitors that steal their intellectual property (IP) without paying taxes or complying with. 3 United States Government Accountability Office. “Intellectual Property: Observations on Efforts to Quantify the Economic Effects of Counterfeit and Pirated Goods.” GAO April 4 U.S. International Trade Commission. “Number of Investigations Instituted by Calendar Year.”. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Economics of Counterfeit Trade: Governments, Consumers, Pirates and Intellectual Property Rights by Alan S. Zimmerman and Peggy E. Chaudhry (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at eBay! Free shipping for many products!

the economics of counterfeit trade governments consumers pirates and intellectual property rights Posted By Georges Simenon Public Library TEXT ID cf Online PDF Ebook Epub Library institutional the economics of counterfeit trade governments consumers pirates and intellectual property rights peggy e chaudhry alan zimmerman publisher. Peggy E Chaudhry, Alan Zimmerman, "The Economics of Counterfeit Trade: Governments, Consumers, Pirates and Intellectual Property Rights" | pages: | ISBN. #1. The counterfeit-passed ratio rises, but less than proportionately with the note. #2. The passed rate is small for low notes, greatly rises, and levels off or drops. #3. Since the s, the counterfeit-passed ratio has drammatically fallen about 90%. #4. The fraction of counterfeit notes found by Federal Reserve Banks falls in the note. ISBN: Published: June Pages: Table of contents | How to obtain this publication. Responding to concerns in governments and the business community, the OECD launched a project in to assess the magnitude and impact of counterfeiting and objective of the project was to improve factual understanding and awareness of how large the problem is and the.